Today we head west to Medora, ND in search of the wild horses in Theodore Roosevelt National Park.




Currently there are wild horses located in eleven states in Western American primarily located on public land. There are passionate battles between domestic cattle/sheep ranchers and those who believe in the wild horse. Not so different from battles raged in the settling of the American West, but now the wild horse is the enemy of the state.




It is difficult to obtain accurate information regarding the plight of the wild horse. If you believe what you read in the NY Times, the wild horse is the obvious enemy. If you believe what you can find on the internet regarding the wild horse—cattle, ranchers, and the state and federal government are the enemy.




One thing is for certain passions fly in support of the wild horse. In fact in 1971 Congress passed the Wild Free Roaming Horse and Burro Act. This law was the first of its kind to protect wild horses and burros. The law stated that “wild horses and burros are living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West,” and that they “enrich the lives of the American people.”




“Living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West,” and that they “enrich the lives of the American people”, that is powerful stuff. I can only speak for myself and what the wild horse symbolizes for me and that is:




  •                        *freedom,

                    *a wild spirit,

                    *a historical figure, and

                    *soulful beauty.






There is more but I have never been able to accurately put it into words, but try passionately to convey it in a photograph.




Thanks for reading, until next time—

Deb










(This is Blaze, my favorite band stallion in Theodore Roosevelt National Park, I hope to find him in his winter splendor.)